i can’t be the only one who hears that phrase and thinks this.

Q

jemembete asked:

Did you illustrate "Hang in there"? I really like it. I like the satire of your comics. They're great. :)

A

oh hi! sorry, i saw your question yesterday, but i couldn’t immediately figure out a good way to respond without reblogging. tumblr’s the worst. i actually didn’t do the ‘hang in there’ cat, sad to say — that was part of my spectacular haul. the artist didn’t put his name on there, or else i’d give him props! anyway, it’s too bad you couldn’t make it to the show, there was some pretty okay work on display, i guess.

teelowegreen:

SERIOUSLY table-sharers at Starbux what do you THINK iā€™m gonna do REALLY

this is still one of the best things i’ve ever made.

SPACE ‘14 in Columbus! Brought home a specsmackular haul and took part in a pretty amazing after party, organized by the incomparable Caitlin McGurk.
Comix-reading, as it turned out, isn’t as challenging as it sounds. Comics tend to imply noise in a lot of ways, like gesture and space and different sizes and shapes of words in the text itself, all of which are designed very specifically to make sense silently. I put a lot of work into implying sound, so I had no idea how my comix would translate on a screen while I acted out the voices. But nonetheless, we seven brave souls, harvested by Caitlin herself, stood up in front of a sweaty room of other weirdos to read from some pieces we wrote— there was maybe 1 person who had read before, and everybody else either expressly or internally expected to “wing it.” (I bumped into the lovely Colleen Clark at the expo before the reading, and we shared our bewilderment and anxiety about doing the reading. It was a huge relief to realize that I wasn’t the only one who felt unsure about how the reading could possibly work.)
I guess the uncertainty and the spontaneity was what made the reading so wonderful, both to perform and to watch. The performers’ nervousness melted into enthusiasm and contagious silliness almost immediately, and the audience danced along with us with so much warmth and energy. I was amazed and so grateful. I sweated my way through an extremely giddy reading, astonished that the room laughed at all the right parts and at least pretended to be following along. Here is the only documentation I think I have of the event? You can kind of see my ghost. It is a glad ghost. SPACE ‘14 in Columbus! Brought home a specsmackular haul and took part in a pretty amazing after party, organized by the incomparable Caitlin McGurk.
Comix-reading, as it turned out, isn’t as challenging as it sounds. Comics tend to imply noise in a lot of ways, like gesture and space and different sizes and shapes of words in the text itself, all of which are designed very specifically to make sense silently. I put a lot of work into implying sound, so I had no idea how my comix would translate on a screen while I acted out the voices. But nonetheless, we seven brave souls, harvested by Caitlin herself, stood up in front of a sweaty room of other weirdos to read from some pieces we wrote— there was maybe 1 person who had read before, and everybody else either expressly or internally expected to “wing it.” (I bumped into the lovely Colleen Clark at the expo before the reading, and we shared our bewilderment and anxiety about doing the reading. It was a huge relief to realize that I wasn’t the only one who felt unsure about how the reading could possibly work.)
I guess the uncertainty and the spontaneity was what made the reading so wonderful, both to perform and to watch. The performers’ nervousness melted into enthusiasm and contagious silliness almost immediately, and the audience danced along with us with so much warmth and energy. I was amazed and so grateful. I sweated my way through an extremely giddy reading, astonished that the room laughed at all the right parts and at least pretended to be following along. Here is the only documentation I think I have of the event? You can kind of see my ghost. It is a glad ghost. SPACE ‘14 in Columbus! Brought home a specsmackular haul and took part in a pretty amazing after party, organized by the incomparable Caitlin McGurk.
Comix-reading, as it turned out, isn’t as challenging as it sounds. Comics tend to imply noise in a lot of ways, like gesture and space and different sizes and shapes of words in the text itself, all of which are designed very specifically to make sense silently. I put a lot of work into implying sound, so I had no idea how my comix would translate on a screen while I acted out the voices. But nonetheless, we seven brave souls, harvested by Caitlin herself, stood up in front of a sweaty room of other weirdos to read from some pieces we wrote— there was maybe 1 person who had read before, and everybody else either expressly or internally expected to “wing it.” (I bumped into the lovely Colleen Clark at the expo before the reading, and we shared our bewilderment and anxiety about doing the reading. It was a huge relief to realize that I wasn’t the only one who felt unsure about how the reading could possibly work.)
I guess the uncertainty and the spontaneity was what made the reading so wonderful, both to perform and to watch. The performers’ nervousness melted into enthusiasm and contagious silliness almost immediately, and the audience danced along with us with so much warmth and energy. I was amazed and so grateful. I sweated my way through an extremely giddy reading, astonished that the room laughed at all the right parts and at least pretended to be following along. Here is the only documentation I think I have of the event? You can kind of see my ghost. It is a glad ghost.

SPACE ā€˜14 in Columbus! Brought home a specsmackular haul and took part in a pretty amazing after party, organized by the incomparable Caitlin McGurk.

Comix-reading, as it turned out, isn’t as challenging as it sounds. Comics tend to imply noise in a lot of ways, like gesture and space and different sizes and shapes of words in the text itself, all of which are designed very specifically to make sense silently. I put a lot of work into implying sound, so I had no idea how my comix would translate on a screen while I acted out the voices. But nonetheless, we seven brave souls, harvested by Caitlin herself, stood up in front of a sweaty room of other weirdos to read from some pieces we wrote— there was maybe 1 person who had read before, and everybody else either expressly or internally expected to “wing it.” (I bumped into the lovely Colleen Clark at the expo before the reading, and we shared our bewilderment and anxiety about doing the reading. It was a huge relief to realize that I wasn’t the only one who felt unsure about how the reading could possibly work.)

I guess the uncertainty and the spontaneity was what made the reading so wonderful, both to perform and to watch. The performers’ nervousness melted into enthusiasm and contagious silliness almost immediately, and the audience danced along with us with so much warmth and energy. I was amazed and so grateful. I sweated my way through an extremely giddy reading, astonished that the room laughed at all the right parts and at least pretended to be following along. Here is the only documentation I think I have of the event? You can kind of see my ghost. It is a glad ghost.

here is a horrible cycle that happens — often times, yes, without ACTUALLY leaving Facebook.

writing my intro to the newest version in ‘breakthroughs in bad words’ and it is just a delight.

i made this horrific New-Yorker-wannabe illustration for a morose open letter that my partner wrote. See the probably-better black and white version accompanying his uproarious letter here!

Cleaning up my micro-comix from “Breakthroughs in Bad Words,” which I’m tryna distribute ~on the fly~ at SPACE in Columbus next month, among other things.

Also, HI NEW FOLLOWERS GARSH YOU ALL ARE NICE.

If you’re tabling at a con as a Li’l Rookie, get ready to experience these 12 Stages of Feels exactly like this. If you’re tabling at a con as a Li’l Rookie, get ready to experience these 12 Stages of Feels exactly like this. If you’re tabling at a con as a Li’l Rookie, get ready to experience these 12 Stages of Feels exactly like this.

If you’re tabling at a con as a Li’l Rookie, get ready to experience these 12 Stages of Feels exactly like this.